The Jumanos: Hunters and Traders of the South Plains


Subjects Jumano Indians -- History -- Sources.

The Jumanos: Hunters and Traders of the South Plains

Jumano Indians -- Social life and customs. Ethnohistory -- Southwest, New. The Travels of Cabeza de Vaca. Explorations by Way of the Western Corridor. Opening the Central Corridor. The Illegal Entrada of Castano de Sosa.

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Hunters and Traders of the South Plains liked it 3. The Jumano Diaspora Pt. Comments and reviews What are comments? We were unable to find this edition in any bookshop we are able to search. The View from Parral. The reader makes the conclusion that the Jumanos are probably the forebearers of the Kiowa Tribe and possibly other tribes of the Southwest and South Plain Indans.

Juan de Onate and the Conquest of New Mexico. The Jumanos at the Dawn of History Pt.

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Franciscans and Indians in New Mexico. New Mexico in the 's. Fray Juan de Salas' Mission to the Jumanos.

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The Jumanos at Mid-Century. The Pueblo Rebellion of and Its Aftermath.

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The Expedition to the Rio de las Nueces. In the first full-length study of the Jumanos, anthropologist Nancy Hickerson proposes that they were indeed a distinctive tribe, their wide travel pattern linked over well-established itineraries. Drawing on extensive primary sources, Hickerson also explores their crucial role as traders in a network extending from the Rio Grande to the Caddoan tribes' confederacies of East Texas and Oklahoma.

Hickerson further concludes that the Jumanos eventually became agents for the Spanish colonies, drafted as mercenary fighters and intelligence-gatherers. Her findings reinterpret the cultural history of the South Plains region, bridging numerous gaps in the area's comprehensive history and in the chronicle of these elusive people.

Paperback , pages. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Jumanos , please sign up. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Jimmy rated it it was ok Aug 14, Mike Bruce rated it really liked it Apr 08, Jacob Hilton rated it really liked it Jan 09, There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. My grandmother often would say, "Somos s Jumanos". Growing up I never knew what or why she said that.

My grandmother was a Indian woman from Ojinaga, Mexico. This book provides answers to a lot of questions about my past. One person found this helpful 2 people found this helpful. I doubt that even the doting author thought this book would make the best seller lists. The Jumanos, for the By they had pretty much disappeared.

So shadowy are they that some authors have even doubted their existence as a tribe.

Latino Americans: On The South Plains

I got interested in the southwestern Indians and kept running into references to the Jumanos, so I read this book -- the only one that's every been written on the Jumanos, I would guess. If you -- like me -- enjoy truly obscure Americana -- especially southwestern Americana -- you might like reading this. The writing is professorial, but the author constructs the history of a vanished people and their contacts with early Spanish and French explorers. She makes a persuasive case that the Jumanos were a Tanoan people, related to many of the Pueblo Indians.

If you comprehend those last two sentences, you might like this book. THis is an outstanding and detailed book about the Jumanos, a Texas tribe with almost prehsitoric history that disappeared in the 's.

The author gives a detailed synopsis about the Jumanos trading with other tribes, encounters with Spanish explorers and their mysterious way of life. A very detailed scholoarly accounting, this book is not for the casual reader. The reader makes the conclusion that the Jumanos are probably the forebearers of the Kiowa Tribe and possibly other tribes of the Southwest and South Plain Indans.

It is a scholarly book that is well written and interesting. Highly recommended for those readers who want an interesting synopsis about this "extinct" tribe that lived in Texas and Oklahoma. One person found this helpful. See all 3 reviews. Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers.

Editorial Reviews

The Jumanos: Hunters and Traders of the South Plains [Nancy Parrott Hickerson] on grapplingindo.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. In the late sixteenth. Editorial Reviews. From Library Journal. In the 16th and 17th centuries, Spanish explorers of the Southwest recounted experiences with natives they called.

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